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  • New Insights on WP: Good practices in fair access

    21 August 2017 by Anne-Marie Canning

    On 14 August 2017, the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) and the social mobility charity Brightside jointly published a collection of essays by senior higher education figures entitled ‘Where next for widening participation and fair access? New insights from leading thinkers’. Since last week, we have been showcasing the contents of this…

  • New Insights on WP: Care leavers and their paths to higher education

    18 August 2017 by Chloë Cockett

    On 14 August 2017, the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) and the social mobility charity Brightside jointly published a collection of essays by senior higher education figures entitled ‘Where next for widening participation and fair access? New insights from leading thinkers’. Over the next few weeks, we will be showcasing the…

  • New Insights on WP: A more radical approach to contextualised admissions

    17 August 2017 by Vikki Boliver, Stephen Gorard and Nadia Siddiqui

    On 14 August 2017, the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) and the social mobility charity Brightside jointly published a collection of essays by senior higher education figures entitled ‘Where next for widening participation and fair access? New insights from leading thinkers’. Over the next few weeks, we will be showcasing the…

  • New Insights on WP: The importance of social capital

    16 August 2017 by Paul Clarke

    On 14 August 2017, the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) and the social mobility charity Brightside jointly published a collection of essays by senior higher education figures entitled ‘Where next for widening participation and fair access? New insights from leading thinkers’. Over the next few weeks, we will be showcasing the…

  • New Insights on Widening Participation: Foreword by Les Ebdon

    15 August 2017 by Les Ebdon CBE DL

    On 14 August 2017, the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) and the social mobility charity Brightside jointly published a collection of essays by senior higher education figures entitled ‘Where next for widening participation and fair access? New insights from leading thinkers’. Over the next few weeks, we will be showcasing the…

  • Measuring teaching intensity: the authors respond to the critics

    7 August 2017 by Gervas Huxley and Mike Peacey

    This guest blog has been written for HEPI by Gervas Huxley and Mike Peacey, the authors of a new academic article that has received considerable media coverage for shining a spotlight on teaching intensity, which is increasingly an interest of the Government too. In research just published in the journal Fiscal Studies, we…

  • How the book can become a badge of belonging in higher education

    21 July 2017 by Alison Baverstock

    This guest blog was written by Alison Baverstock, Associate Professor at Kingston University and Director of The KU Big Read. I’m feeling conflicted. Obviously this article is being published after internal consultation at Kingston University, but I am nevertheless aware that I’m in danger of revealing a significant Kingston USP,…

  • Jo Johnson: Value for Money?

    19 July 2017

    Tomorrow, Jo Johnson (the Minister for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation) is delivering a speech to the Reform think tank on ‘Securing VFM for students in HE’. In plain English, VFM means ‘value-for-money’. So the speech could be ten times more interesting than it may sound. There are a number…

  • How do you create a university for students?

    14 July 2017 by Jon Wakeford

    This guest blog comes from Jon Wakeford, Group Director, Strategy and Corporate Communications, at the University Partnerships Programme (UPP). It was originally presented as a speech at the 2017 HEPI Annual Conference at Regent’s University London on 7 June. With the numerous political and economic upheavals taking place in the UK…

  • Adonis Mark I versus Adonis Mark II

    13 July 2017 by Nick Hillman

    When politicians associated with one particular policy or another change their mind, it is often a reason to cheer. This is because it tends to happen when they recognise some old evidence is correct after all or some new evidence comes to light and they respond to it. In general, our…